Avineon Launches a Portal on the Innovation Lab to Highlight the Next Evolution of GIS Network Management: Esri’s Utility Network | MundoGEO

Avineon Launches a Portal on the Innovation Lab to Highlight the Next Evolution of GIS Network Management: Esri’s Utility Network

By Ana Flávia de Oliveira | 17h14, 29 de June de 2017

Avineon Logo 300x150 Avineon Launches a Portal on the Innovation Lab to Highlight the Next Evolution of GIS Network Management: Esri’s Utility NetworkAvineon, a successful provider of geospatial, information technology, and engineering support services for over 25 years, has launched a new portion of the Avineon Innovation Lab dedicated to insightful articles, white papers, and videos highlighting the impact of Esri’s Network Management System in the ArcGIS Platform.

GIS services and solutions have been a part of Avineon’s success for the last 25 years. Keeping pace with evolving technology and the impact GIS has on companies in the utility and telecommunications industries remains a competency that differentiates Avineon from its competitors. To that end, Avineon announced today the launch of a new section of the Avineon Innovation Lab focusing on Avineon’s contributions, expertise, and partnership with Esri on the next evolution of GIS Network Management: the Utility Network.

“Avineon has been a valuable partner and contributor to Esri’s Utility Network throughout the early adopter program, providing valuable feedback to our product teams,” commented Bill Meehan, Director of Utility Solutions for Esri. Mr. Meehan continued, “The resulting Network Management System in the ArcGIS Platform will support utility and telecommunication companies as they execute their business plans for innovation, digital transition and transformation, sustainability, and smart ecosystems (smart grid, smart buildings, smart transportation, smart cities, etc.). We believe Avineon’s partnership with Esri and offerings like Avineon’s Head Start program, as well as observations into the practical applications of the Utility Network, through their Innovation Lab, will help industries understand the strategic and tactical pathway to maximize the value of their GIS now and into the future.”

Joel Campbell, Avineon’s Vice President of Commercial Systems, added, “As an Esri business partner, it is exciting to support our customers and contribute to Esri’s vision of the ArcGIS Platform. These new capabilities serve as the foundation for delivering a new generation of business applications leveraging web and services patterns as well as evolved network management capabilities. We at Avineon look forward to utilizing our Innovation Lab as an outlet to share the lessons learned, best practices, and case studies around the newest evolution of GIS and its impact on the utility and telecommunication industries.”

For more information on Avineon’s Head Start Program, partnership and insights on Esri’s Utility Network, please visit https://avineonlab.com/esri-utility-network/.

Applanix and the University of Waterloo Collaborate on Advanced Guidance and Control Technologies for Autonomous Vehicles

By Ana Flávia de Oliveira | 16h56, 29 de June de 2017

5a114ebd 0b7f 4d3a bd11 6dc5949b8fbe 300x149 Applanix and the University of Waterloo Collaborate on Advanced Guidance and Control Technologies for Autonomous VehiclesApplanix, a Trimble Company, announced today that it is collaborating on advanced research for autonomous vehicle guidance and control systems with the University of Waterloo Centre in Ontario, Canada for Automotive Research (WatCAR). Applanix will provide WatCAR with its industry-leading Positioning and Orientation System (POS) for testing autonomous guidance and control systems in real-world conditions. Applanix will also provide the Trimble GNSS-Inertial board set for integration with car systems and sensors to enable precise positioning.

The Applanix POS LV is an industry leader in robust, reliable and repeatable positioning solutions for on- and off-road vehicles. Applanix technology will be used by WatCAR to assess the performance of the guidance and control systems on board their autonomous vehicles. This testing will take place in challenging weather conditions and environments including on roads under repair, with lane reductions and closures, are wet or covered in snow, and where there is poor visibility.

Applanix will also provide WatCAR with Trimble on-board GNSS-Inertial board set designed for high-performance, high-volume Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) applications. These products, currently used in a variety of autonomous vehicle programs, include the Trimble® AP GNSS-Inertial board set that includes a high-precision Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). Small, rugged and low powered, the AP board sets provide the precise positioning needed for autonomous vehicle applications as they navigate their environment. Ideal for use on all sizes and types of vehicles, the AP boards feature Trimble’s high-performance precision GNSS receivers and Applanix’ industry-leading IN-Fusion™ GNSS-Inertial integrated technology that produces uninterrupted position, roll, pitch and true heading measurements of moving platforms. Integrating easily with vehicle sensors, the AP board sets are essential for precise vehicle control when interacting with a constantly changing environment.

Applanix’ deep expertise in these autonomous technologies is part of a broader Trimble solutions portfolio for automation and vehicle autonomy, which began more than three decades ago. Trimble has a long history of using automation to improve safety and productivity—from pioneering automated blade control for earthmoving and providing positioning solutions for some of the earliest robotic applications in the 1990s to delivering automated steering for farmers and providing positioning technology for fully autonomous off- and on-highway trucks. In addition, Trimble further enables high-accuracy solutions by leveraging its global infrastructure to deliver GNSS corrections to support autonomous operations globally. The relationship with WatCAR will aid in improving the core technologies that deliver high-end systems capabilities for a variety of Trimble markets.

“We are excited to collaborate with the University of Waterloo and WatCAR on this leading research in autonomous vehicle technology,” said Louis Nastro, Director of Land Products at Applanix. “Applanix has been committed to meeting the needs of autonomous vehicle manufacturers for more than a decade, as first demonstrated in the early days of the DARPA Grand Challenge. And today, we are also part of many autonomous vehicle programs deployed worldwide in commercial applications.”

“The Trimble AP products, first introduced in 2009, are designed for use in small, mass market vehicles where size, weight and cost factors are important. They have also been designed to easily integrate with the industry’s leading sensors, making them an ideal solution for autonomous vehicle navigation systems and sub-systems,” said Nastro.

“We welcome the opportunity to work with Applanix, a leader in reference systems. Their technology identifies, with very high accuracy, the exact location of our vehicle at all times,” said Ross McKenzie, Managing Director of WatCAR.  “Applanix is a valued industry partner and their team is great to work with. Going forward we anticipate a solution that will enable autonomous vehicles to traverse the real world reliably and safely.”

CompassDrone to Demo Integration of DJI Video with ArcGIS at Esri Mapping Forum

By Ana Flávia de Oliveira | 16h52, 29 de June de 2017

CompassDrone Logo small 300x150 CompassDrone to Demo Integration of DJI Video with ArcGIS at Esri Mapping ForumFull motion video (FMV) captured by the best-selling drones in the world can now be viewed, queried and used for professional mapping projects in Esri ArcGIS. CompassDrone™ will introduce DJI2FMV, a beta script soon to be rolled out as a web-accessible application, at the 2017 Esri Imaging & Mapping Forum in July.

CompassDrone developed DJI2FMV in cooperation with DJI, the leading provider of consumer and professional-grade imaging drones, to make DJI-captured video and telemetry accessible via the Esri Full Motion Video Multiplexer Add-in for ArcGIS. FMV mapping is used extensively in utility maintenance, public safety & security, crop monitoring, wildfire management, tree inventorying, and numerous public works projects.

“The ability to extract mapping-grade data from full motion drone video has traditionally been available primarily to military organizations using costly unmanned aerial systems (UAS),” said Hayden Howard, CompassDrone Vice President. “With the CompassDrone DJI2FMV tool, professional FMV mapping can be performed with the affordable and easy-to-use drones produced by DJI.”

Representatives from CompassDrone and DJI will demonstrate DJI2FMV and showcase the soon to be released CompassDrone Mapping app in booth M411 July 8 and 9 at the Esri Imaging & Mapping Forum held just prior to the Esri User Conference in San Diego. The app will also be showcased in CompassCom’s booth (2218) at the User Conference.

CompassDrone’s Howard will discuss the development of DJI2FMV and its practical applications at 12:30 pm on Saturday, July 8, and again at 3:15 pm on Sunday, July 9, at the Imaging & Mapping Forum, which will be held in the Manchester Grand Hyatt in San Diego.

As a DJI Enterprise Dealer, CompassDrone supports DJI users in professional geospatial applications of their drone systems. In developing DJI2FMV, CompassDrone mapping experts wrote a script that extracts 12 key telemetry elements collected by the drone during flight, such as locations, headings and attitudes of the camera and platform. The script then correlates this flight information with the captured FMV to match telemetry with every second of video.

“DJI2FMV imports the telemetry and video files into Esri’s FMV Multiplexer to create MISB-compliant videos in ArcGIS with full GIS functionality,” said Howard.

Once in ArcGIS, the video can be viewed and queried like any other GIS-ready image. Users can watch the video in one screen while viewing the drone’s location and movement on a map display. Precise altitude and location coordinates can be queried at any point in the video. More importantly, the user can access ArcGIS tools to delineate and extract ground features in the video, and the resulting polygons show up instantly in the GIS map. Extraction can also be performed from the GIS map to the video.

“Esri users have the ability to map features and objects directly from full motion video without leaving their ArcGIS environment,” said Howard. “The mapping results are fast and high quality.”

For a limited time, CompassDrone is signing DJI2FMV beta users. To learn how to participate in the beta program, visit https://compassdrone.com/software/dji2fmv/.

Second Lockheed Martin GPS-3 satellite assembled as full production begins

By Ana Flávia de Oliveira | 11h25, 29 de June de 2017

gps 3 satellite 600 lg Second Lockheed Martin GPS 3 satellite assembled as full production beginsIn a specialized cleanroom designed to streamline satellite production, Lockheed Martin is in full production building GPS III – the world’s most powerful GPS satellites. The company’s second GPS III satellite is now assembled and preparing for environmental testing, and the third satellite is close behind, having just received its navigation payload.

In May, the U.S. Air Force’s second GPS III satellite was fully assembled and entered into Space Vehicle (SV) single line flow when Lockheed Martin technicians successfully integrated its system module, propulsion core and antenna deck. GPS III SV02 smoothly came together through a series of carefully-orchestrated manufacturing maneuvers utilizing a 10-ton crane.

GPS III SV02 is part of the Air Force’s next generation of GPS satellites, which have three times better accuracy and up to eight times improved anti-jamming capabilities. Spacecraft life will extend to 15 years, 25 percent longer than the newest GPS satellites on-orbit today.

“Now fully-integrated, GPS III SV02 will begin environmental testing this summer to ensure the satellite is ready for the rigors of space,” said Mark Stewart, vice president of Navigation Systems for Lockheed Martin. “This testing simulates harsh launch and space environments the satellite will endure, and further reduces any risk prior to it being available for launch in 2018.”

A Factory Full of GPS III Satellites
Right behind GPS III SV02, eight more contracted GPS III satellites are moving through production flow at Lockheed Martin’s nearly 40,000 sq. ft., state-of-the-art GPS III Processing Facility near Denver.

GPS III SV03 recently completed initial power on of its bus, which contains the electronics that operate the satellite. The company received SV03′s navigation payload from its supplier, Harris Corporation, in May. After further system testing, SV03 will be ready for full integration later this fall.

GPS III SV04′s major electronics are being populated as it prepares for its own initial power on. This satellite’s navigation payload is expected to arrive and be integrated into its space vehicle before the end of the year.

Components of the next six satellites, GPS III SV05-10, are arriving at Lockheed Martin daily from more than 250 suppliers in 29 states. To date, more than 70 percent of parts and materials for SV05-08 have been received. The company was put under production contract for SV09-10 in late 2016.

All of these satellites are now following the Air Force’s first GPS III satellite, GPS III SV01, through a proven assembly, integration and test flow. SV01 completed its final Factory Functional Qualification Testing and was placed into storage in February 2017 ahead of its expected 2018 launch.

Investing in the Future of GPS III
With multiple satellites now in production, Lockheed Martin engineers are building GPS III smarter and faster. Key to their success is the company’s GPS III Processing Facility, a cleanroom manufacturing center designed in a virtual-reality environment to maximize production efficiency. Lockheed Martin invested $128 million in the new center, which opened in 2011.

The company’s unique satellite design includes a flexible, modular architecture that allows for the easy insertion of new technology as it becomes available in the future or if the Air Force’s mission needs change. Satellites based off this design also will already be compatible with both the Air Force’s next generation Operational Control System (OCX) and the existing GPS constellation.

“From day one, GPS III has been a team effort and our successes would not have been possible without a strong Air Force partnership. GPS III will ensure the U.S. maintains the gold standard for positioning, navigation and timing,” said Stewart. “We look forward to bringing GPS III’s new capabilities to our warfighters and beginning to launch these satellites in 2018.”

The GPS III team is led by the Global Positioning Systems Directorate at the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center. Air Force Space Command’s 2nd Space Operations Squadron (2SOPS), based at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, manages and operates the GPS constellation for both civil and military users.

New orbiters for Europe’s Galileo satnav system

By Ana Flávia de Oliveira | 11h08, 29 de June de 2017

gps galileo full operational capability satellite lg New orbiters for Europes Galileo satnav systemThe European Space Agency signed a contract with a German-British consortium Thursday to build eight more satellites for its Galileo satnav system, an alternative to America’s GPS, the agency said Thursday.

The deal was signed at the International Paris Air Show with German company OHB as the prime contractor, and Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd in charge of navigation systems.

The ESA signed on behalf of the European Commission, which owns and funds the system.

“Europe’s Galileo navigation constellation will gain an additional eight satellites, bringing it to completion,” the ESA said in a statement.

Eighteen Galileo satellites have been placed in Earth’s orbit to date, with four more due for launch later this year.

With the last eight satellites to be built and tested by OHB, the 10-billion-euro ($11-billion) constellation will ultimately comprise 30 orbiters.

Twenty-four will be operational, in three orbital planes, with the rest standing by as spares, in orbit and on the ground.

The European Commission expects Galileo to be fully operational by 2020.

The project has experienced many setbacks, including the placement of two satellites in the wrong orbit.

Galileo went live in December last year, providing initial services with a weak signal, having taken 17 years and more than triple the original budget.

The civilian-controlled service is seen as strategically important for Europe, which relies on two military-run rivals — GPS and Russia’s GLONASS.

Neither provides a guarantee of uninterrupted service.

In January, ESA said the system suffered another setback, with atomic clocks — claimed by the agency to be the most accurate ever flown for geolocalisation — failing onboard a number of satellites in space.

Each Galileo satellite has four ultra-accurate atomic timekeepers, but needs just one working clock.

The failure of nine clocks out of 72 launched so far, has not affected operation, the agency said at the time.

But it would necessitate a relook at clock design, meaning further possible delays.

Thursday’s statement said the eight new satellites are based on the approved design for the previous ones, but will feature “improvements based on lessons learnt.”

Once fully deployed, Galileo aims to pinpoint a location on Earth to within a metre — compared to several metres for GPS and GLONASS.

Clients of a paying service can get even more accurate readings — down to centimetres.

It will also offer search-and-rescue services.

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